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Sunday, February 01, 2009

Let's review, shall we?

It is now clear to anyone who cares to examine the timing, that operation Cast Lead was planned and executed down to the minute for the sole purpose of bolstering Kadima's and Labor's flagging support in the polls (because of their perceived weakness in the face of terror).  The timing of the operation was such that it would allow both Livni and Barak to get some military 'cred', while getting the last IDF soldier off the battlefield before Obama's inauguration. 

They made it with less than two hours to spare.

The only two conditions for our unilateral cease fire in Gaza were the following:

1.  A complete end of fire from Gaza into Israel.  That includes everything from rockets and mortars to bombs and bullets.

2.  A complete end to smuggling of arms into Gaza.

Let's review shall we? 

In the two weeks since we left Gaza (leaving the newly relevant Hamas in power and Gilad Shalit still in their hands), there has been well documented smuggling activity in the tunnels Israel failed to destroy, as well as feverish work being undertaken to repair those tunnels that are salvageable. 

During that time, eight rockets have been fired into Israel (including a Grad missile that hit Ashkelon and a kassam that landed between two kindergartens this morning). At least four mortars were fired and a roadside bomb (that killed one soldier and wounded several others) was detonated. 

Of course there were numerous incidents of small arms fire from Gaza as well, but let's not quibble.

So, how'd we do?  Not so well?  Is anyone out there surprised?

I'm not sure which was more predictable; the fact that the Gazan terrorists have continued to fire at us... or that with less than two weeks to go before the elections, both Barak and Livni are suddenly calling for hugely disproportionate responses to each attack on Israel.

Where exactly were their outrage and calls to arms for the past three years?  Why the sudden interest in disproportionality?

Make no mistake, our response should be disproportionate.   But not on the battlefield.  I'm talking about at the polls.  Let the next government decide how best to rebuild Israel's deterrence.  The participants in the current government should first be punished soundly at the polls... and then (IMHO) punished in the courts.

The Israeli public should punish the leaders of both Labor and Kadima for their cynical use of our children's lives on the battlefield for political gain.  The blood of our soldiers should be more expensive than the ink used to print campaign posters... and any politician who confuses the two should be made to pay dearly. 

Posted by David Bogner on February 1, 2009 | Permalink

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Probably why Likud and Yisrael Beitenu will clean up at the polls. People in Israel on all sides except the most extreme left are finally sick and tired of talk and no action. Took too long, but I hope Bibi and whoever else can help will change the equation that's been used to deal with the violence emanating from Gaza. Cast Lead II anyone?

Posted by: Joshua K | Feb 1, 2009 3:10:11 PM

Does Netanyahu have any history of standing up to the US and EU all the way through a given situation? Or does he also let impressive opening statements go to waste?

Posted by: Bob Miller | Feb 1, 2009 5:07:29 PM

Have you seen the TV election ads? Both Kadima and Avodah are shamelessly trying to exploit the Gaza operation for political gain.

Posted by: aschoichet | Feb 2, 2009 12:13:26 AM

Bob Miller--
More than Israel needs someone to "stand up" to the U.S. State Department; it needs someone who's persuasive in getting its message through to the American people. I don't know how (in Hebrew) Netanyahu comes across as an Israeli politician, but (in English) he's a master of persuasion and diplomacy.

Posted by: Bob | Feb 2, 2009 8:13:13 AM

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