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Monday, November 19, 2012

The family logistics the news never talks about

With all the media outlets fighting over who can provide the most dramatically inspirational (or dramatically critical) portrayal of the current conflict, one of the things that tends to never get mentioned is the day-to-day logistics of being a parent in a country under attack.

For example, most of the schools that are in range of the Gaza rockets have been ordered closed by the Homefront Command.  However, businesses have been allowed to make their own determination as to whether to remain open or not.

The obvious logistical problem arises when young kids are suddenly forced to stay home but parents are required to work.  Who looks after the kids?  Who makes sure they have proper supervision... that they make it to the shelters in time when the sirens wail... that they get things as basic as timely snacks and nutritious meals???

My 18 year old daughter is currently studying at a Mechina (a pre-military program between high school and the army) and they have individually and collectively decided (along with many similar groups) to travel to communities within missile range of Gaza to set up youth programs so that parents can go to work with an easy mind.

Most parents, that is. 

My daughter, who has been safely studying in the Jordan Valley in one of the few parts of the country currently out of rocket range, is willingly relocating to a place where they have between 15 and 30 seconds to find shelter when the 'Code Red' sirens sound.

I am so proud of her for this decision that I wish I could give her a promotion to some higher level of human being; Princess or Empress, perhaps.  But I am also terrified.

All over the south, difficult decisions are being made... and wonderful, strong, resilient Israelis (like my daughter), are stepping up and providing solutions to logistical problems that probably never even occurred to most people outside of Israel.

Posted by David Bogner on November 19, 2012 | Permalink

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Hon, thanks for once again finding a way to eloquently articulate the tug-of-war in my head....

Ariella: if you see this, consider yourself squeezed/smooched by both of your incredibly proud parents. And remember: we love you oodles and caboodles, forever and ever!!!!!!

Posted by: zahava | Nov 19, 2012 12:34:25 PM

Oh my. Wow. If I may say so, I am incredibly proud of Ariella as well. To have a daughter with the will and commitment and values to make a decision like that is more than reason enough to have made aliyah, all by itself. כל הכבוד

Posted by: Alisha | Nov 19, 2012 1:01:53 PM

i am honored to know your EMPRESS-i totally agree!!!!

Posted by: ANNETTE | Nov 19, 2012 1:02:54 PM

So not surprised. You have got an AMAZING daughter, who is a reflection of two fabulous parents.

Posted by: SaraK | Nov 19, 2012 2:56:26 PM

why am i not suprised - kol hakavod!

Posted by: robert | Nov 19, 2012 4:56:47 PM

I am praying for you folks.

I can imagine the pride that you have for your daughter's bravery and dedication.

MC

Posted by: mostly cajun | Nov 19, 2012 5:26:21 PM

Countess Ariella of Efrat! Well done young lady.

Posted by: Kiwi Noa | Nov 19, 2012 8:36:04 PM

Outstanding. God bless you and keep you, Ariella.

Posted by: antares | Nov 20, 2012 2:55:34 AM

A proud and equally terrified aunt weighs in and is not surprised at this decision... She's an amazing woman!

Posted by: Val | Nov 21, 2012 2:33:15 AM

You guys did something really, really right. Kol hakavod, Ariella.

Posted by: Alissa | Nov 21, 2012 3:56:05 PM

Kol hakavod to Zahavah and David for raising such an outstanding human being, and kol hakavod to Ariella for being that outstanding human being.

Posted by: Amanda | Nov 22, 2012 12:19:09 PM

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